Map of Traditional Territories

The Champagne and Aishihik people invite you to learn more about our kéyi (country). In kwädąy (long ago) times, our people lived on the land, staying in small communities or camps over the course of the year. This map highlights the different parts of dákéyi (our country) and settlements where our people live today and have lived in times past.

Some of our dän nàjè yu (settlements) are tra­ditional ones, others are modern communities established after the Alaska Highway was built through dákéyi. Some of our places feature modern homes that are year-round residences while others have (cabins) or kų k’änji (camps) used on a seasonal basis. Old build­ings and structures such as dakàt or njù kwänji da’ą (caches) can be seen at many places across dákéyi.

All Champagne and Aishihik Dän (people) have a family connection to at least one of these traditional settlements. The memories from these places and the kwändür (stories) told about life at them help shape the identity of dádän (our people). Our places and our kwändür are an important part of our culture and identity. We have a responsibility to keep both these alive within our families and our communities, and we are happy to share them with visitors to dákéyi.

To learn more about our traditional areas, please hover your mouse over the icons on the map or click on the icon for more information about each settlement.

  • Äsheyi (Aishihik)

    Äsheyi (Aishihik) Äsheyi (Aishihik) settlement is located at the north end of Män Shäw (big lake), also known as Äsheyi Män (Aishihik Lake). The village’s name is Tlingit in origin and refers to its location at “’the head of the lake,” a good place to catch fish. During World War II, the army constructed a road north from the Alaska Highway and built an airport at Äsheyi, connecting the village to the “outside.” In the late 1960s, the federal government moved the Äsheyi kwädan (families) to Dak­wäkäda (Haines Junction). Only a few years later, a hydroelectric dam was constructed at the south end of the big lake and the changing water levels severely impacted the lakeshore and fishery. Äsheyi has been revitalized in recent years as families come here to reconnect to the land and their history.

    Details

  • Tthechal (Sekulmun)

  • Chami (Chemi)

  • Chu’ena Kéyi (Hutchi)

    Chu’ena Kéyi, meaning “type of whitefish found in the lake + village” is a traditional settlement situated on Chu’ena Män (middle Hutchi Lake). During the 19th century, Chu’ena Kéyi was a centre for nt’akedaye (trade). The Chilkat Tlingit from Klukwan brought European trade goods here to trade for nena dhü (furs) trapped by our people. The village’s Tlingit name, Hutchi, refers to this being the “last stop” made by traders before they returned home to the coast with bundles of furs. In kwädąy (long ago) times, Chu’ena Kéyi was a meeting place. Every few years our people gathered here to discuss issues of concern, such as the distribution and condition of the animals. The gatherings provided an oppor­tunity to reconnect with family and other Dän (First Nation people) from across the southern Yukon.

    Details

  • K’ùä Män (Kloo Lake)

    K’ùä Män (Kloo Lake) K’ùä Män (Kloo Lake) is located in the western part of dákéyi (our country). It drains southwards via the Tsigra Chùa (Jarvis), Kaskawulsh and Alsek Rivers into the Pacific Ocean. The traditional name of the lake means “fishtrap lake,” but more recently it became referred to as Kloo Lake, meaning łu (whitefish) or fish lake.

    Details

  • The Yänlin Chemi (Canyon Creek)

    The Yänlin Chemi (Canyon Creek) Canyon is located near where Canyon Creek (also known as the Aishihik River) flows into the Dezadeash River. The traditional name for the settlement, The Yänlin, means “water flowing through the rocks.” A small community grew at Canyon in the early 20th century. Today, Canyon offers its residents the quiet life­style of a traditional village. The Aishihik Road begins near Canyon. As this road climbs its way north to Aishihik Village, it passes Ädäts’ür Män and Äshèyi Män (Canyon and Aishihik Lakes). The small settlement known as Chemi, mean­ing “fishnet place,” is located at the north end of Ädäts’ür Män.

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  • Shadhäla (Champagne)

    Shadhäla (Champagne Shadhäla, meaning “little sunny mountain,” is located on a bend of Shadhäla Chù (Dezadeash or Champagne River), also known as Titl’àt Män Tágà (head of the lake river). The village is located at the intersection of the main north-south and east-west traditional travel routes or tän (trails) through the heart of dákéyi (our country). The community was the Dän headquarters, where families from throughout the Traditional Territory gathered. The Kajit kų and Agunda kų (Crow and Wolf clan houses) were located here, and the cemetery was our main tth’än k’e (burial ground). Shadhäla is still a cultural hub. We gather here to honour our people during funerals and memorial potlatches.

    Details

  • Nàkhu/Takhini (Kusawa/Takhini)

    Nàkhu/Takhini (Kusawa/Takhini) Nàkhų Män (Kusawa Lake), in the eastern part of dákéyi (our country), drains north via the Nàkhų Chù (Takhini River) into the Tágà Shäw (Yukon River). Nakhų, meaning hų (raft) crossing, is an old settlement located by the narrows near the north end of the lake. The Takhini River settlement is one of our newest communities and is home to many young families. In kwädąy times, people stayed in places throughout the Takhini Val­ley. A large kwak’än (forest fire) swept through the Takhini area in the 1950s.

    Details

  • Dakwäkäda (Haines Junction)

    Dakwäkäda (Haines Junction) Situated at the base of the Auriol Range of mountains, Dakwäkäda (high cache place) is home to many of our Citizens and the headquarters of our government. Dakwäkäda is not a traditional community, but was established after the Alaska Highway and Haines Road were built in 1942–43. As businesses and buildings sprang up, a community grew at the junction of the two highways. In kwädąy (long ago) times, Dakwäkäda was at the intersection of various trails. It was a place where local families cached goods, especially the food that had been caught in the area.

    Details

  • Nàkhu/Takhini (Kusawa/Takhini)

    Nàkhu/Takhini (Kusawa/Takhini) Nàkhų Män (Kusawa Lake), in the eastern part of dákéyi (our country), drains north via the Nàkhų Chù (Takhini River) into the Tágà Shäw (Yukon River). Nakhų, meaning hų (raft) crossing, is an old settlement located by the narrows near the north end of the lake. The Takhini River settlement is one of our newest communities and is home to many young families. In kwädąy times, people stayed in places throughout the Takhini Val­ley. A large kwak’än (forest fire) swept through the Takhini area in the 1950s.

    Details

  • Łu Ghą (Klukshu)

    Łu Ghą (Klukshu) Łu Ghą, meaning “a place for fishing,” is the most northerly of our fishing villages in the Tatshenshini River basin. The village is situated at the outlet of Łu Ghą Män (Klukshu Lake), where the salmon spawn and conditions are good for łu ghats’agän (drying fish). In recent decades, Łu ghą has become the main Champagne and Aishihik fishing village. Many families have seasonal cabins and gather here to shakāt (harvest) fish and pass on our traditions to dádùnèna (younger community members).

    Details

  • Shäwshe/ Neskatahin (Dalton Post)

    Shäwshe/ Neskatahin (Dalton Post) Shäwshe was once the largest village in the southern part of dákéyi (our country). Understood by our Elders to be a very old settlement, Shäwshe is situated on the Tatshenshini River between two salmon äjel (spawning) streams. Families from across the southern Yukon came here when the fish were running. Shäwshe also came to be known by the Tlingit name Neskatahin.

    Details

  • Nuqwa’ik /Àłsêxh (Tatshenshini/Alsek)

    Nuqwa’ik /Àłsêxh (Tatshenshini/Alsek) The southern part of our Traditional Territory, now within the province of British Columbia, is the area most closely connected to our Tlingit heritage. The heart of this region is the sambay (salmon)-rich Tatshenshini River, traditionally known as the Àłsêxh (Tlingit) or Shäwshe Chù (Dän K’e). This part of dákéyi (our country) is a crossroads, connecting different peoples and regions. Today’s Haines Road follows an old foot trail through the Chilkat Pass. In 1993 the lands west of this highway in British Columbia were designated as a park.

    Details

  • Nuqwa’ik /Àłsêxh (Tatshenshini/Alsek)

    Nuqwa’ik /Àłsêxh (Tatshenshini/Alsek) The southern part of our Traditional Territory, now within the province of British Columbia, is the area most closely connected to our Tlingit heritage. The heart of this region is the sambay (salmon)-rich Tatshenshini River, traditionally known as the Àłsêxh (Tlingit) or Shäwshe Chù (Dän K’e). This part of dákéyi (our country) is a crossroads, connecting different peoples and regions. Today’s Haines Road follows an old foot trail through the Chilkat Pass. In 1993 the lands west of this highway in British Columbia were designated as a park.

    Details