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Clarifying a Matter on the Hunting of Cow Moose: Understanding Harvesting Rights and Responsibilities

By: Micheal Jim – Fish and Wildlife Officer

In response to GA Resolution 2013-27 Cow Moose Population

The moose population within our traditional territory has shown a significant decline over the years. However, with your support and participation it does not have to get worse.

In 2008 a moose survey was conducted in the area known as Zone 7 south of the Alaska Highway and from Kusawa Lake to the Haines Road. The survey results show moose are at or near the lowest numbers that have ever been recorded for this area.  Moose abundance has declined significantly since the last survey in 1998.

Estimated harvest rates are close to or exceed the normal limits in more accessible portions of the area, particularly in areas close to Haines Junction and along Haines Road south of Dezadeash Lake.

CAFN’s “HUNTING AND FISHING: Your Harvesting Rights & Responsibilities as a Beneficiary of Champagne and Aishihik First Nations” brochure was developed to communicate awareness on your responsibilities as a beneficiary of CAFN’s Final Agreement. As part of the CAFN Wildlife Harvesting Regulations, a No Cow Moose hunting regulation was passed in 2000, which prohibits any beneficiary,other than an elder who has obtained a permit, from hunting a female moose.

Due to an increase in cow moose harvest occurring within our traditional territory by CAFN hunters, CAFN citizens passed a General Assembly Resolution in 2013 and CAFN Council recently passed a resolution in support, that no permits to harvest cow moose shall be issued.  Further consultation with the Elders and CAFN community is required for direction on this issue.

All beneficiaries have a collective responsibility of ensuring sustainable use of CAFN’s resources and with continued support from our subsistence hunters, we can have healthy moose populations for future generations. This resolution is a conservation measure that does not deny your hunting rights for subsistence, it only restricts cow moose harvesting.

Please refer to your copy of the harvesting rights and responsibility brochure or contact your First Nation’s fish and wildlife office if you have any questions or please call us at (867) 634-4211 or (867) 456-6885.

It is very important that we be conservative when hunting and do not harvest cow moose.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU SHOOT A COW MOOSE

No Moose

This graphic reflects the average birth and death rate within a population over a 10 year period.

If Cow Moose harvesting continues, it will result in removing all future offspring from the population as shown above.

By harvesting a Bull Moose, it only removes one moose from the population.